Texas MRC Research Projects

 

We propose to develop a fully automated blood infusion pump equipped with peripherals for monitoring the critical signs and parameters for the fetal blood transfusion operation. The proposed system is called the Computerized Infusion and Monitoring System for Fetal Blood Transfusion, or Computerized Fetal Transfusion System (CFTS) for short. It is to facilitate the blood transfusion operations with high precision and reliability under full control of the surgeon. Intrauterine fetal blood transfusion for Rh disease (Rhesus isoimmunisation) is a lifesaving operation which becomes necessary when Rh-sensitized mother’s immune system attacks and destroys fetal red blood cells endangering the life of the fetus during pregnancy. The fetal blood transfusion through the umbilical vein in the placenta is a delicate operation providing blood to fetus directly with fast positive results. Such operation may need to be repeated multiple times during a pregnancy.

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The definitive procedure for breast cancer diagnosis is needle biopsy, either using stereotactic x-ray or ultrasound guidance. Each method of guidance has its advantages and disadvantages, and for experienced clinicians both methods can provide an excellent specificity for diagnosis. We recognize however a growing preference for ultrasound-guided biopsy, despite the obvious limitation that ultrasound imaging is operator dependent. Our goal is to minimize the operator-dependence of ultrasound-guided needle breast biopsy by developing a haptic-interface for the procedure that will provide the clinician with additional guidance in completing the procedure. In addition, we reason that the system will also serve as a trainer and simulator for improving the needle biopsy skills in residents and fellows. (more…)

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Through the support of the TexasMRC Grant, the research team has made progress towards investigating a new method for Sudden Unexpected Infant Death (SUID) monitoring that uses CO2 sensors placed in a crib around an infant to non-invasively monitor the variation in exhaled air concentration from him/her.  The goal is to detect any abnormal or irregular patterns in the infant’s breathing by monitoring the outputs of the CO2 sensors.  The output data can be used to activate an alarm or logged for diagnosis. (more…)
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